/ by Belinda Morris

 So after a bit of research (a lot of the suggested plants were actually introduced to the UK after the 10th Century) I chose Artemisia Vulgaris otherwise known as Mugwort. If you slide to the right you can see some of the reference photos I used for this unassuming plant.  

 “Artemisia vulgaris (common mugwort[2] or common wormwood) is one of several species in the genus Artemisia commonly known as mugwort, although Artemisia vulgaris is the species most often called mugwort. This species is also occasionally known as riverside wormwood,[3] felon herb, chrysanthemum weed, wild wormwood, old Uncle Henry, sailor’s tobacco, naughty man, old man or St. John’s plant (not to be confused with St John’s wort).[4] Mugworts have been used medicinally and as culinary herbs….In the European Middle Ages, mugwort was used as a magical protective herb. Mugwort was used to repel insects, especially moths, from gardens. Mugwort has also been used from ancient times as a remedy against fatigue and to protect travelers against evil spirits and wild animals. Roman soldiers put mugwort in their sandals to protect their feet against fatigue.[13] Mugwort is one of the nine herbs invoked in the pagan Anglo-Saxon Nine Herbs Charm, recorded in the 10th century in the Lacnunga.” Wikipedia 

 #mugwort #earthmagic #wip #oraclecardart #fantasyart #illustration #jade-sky #duralar #prismacolorcolerase #fae #earthspirits #oracle #belindaillustrates #australianartist #melbourneartist #july2018 #pencildrawing #happytree #forestpeople #blueangel @changelingartist  (at Melbourne, Victoria, Australia)

So after a bit of research (a lot of the suggested plants were actually introduced to the UK after the 10th Century) I chose Artemisia Vulgaris otherwise known as Mugwort. If you slide to the right you can see some of the reference photos I used for this unassuming plant.

“Artemisia vulgaris (common mugwort[2] or common wormwood) is one of several species in the genus Artemisia commonly known as mugwort, although Artemisia vulgaris is the species most often called mugwort. This species is also occasionally known as riverside wormwood,[3] felon herb, chrysanthemum weed, wild wormwood, old Uncle Henry, sailor’s tobacco, naughty man, old man or St. John’s plant (not to be confused with St John’s wort).[4] Mugworts have been used medicinally and as culinary herbs….In the European Middle Ages, mugwort was used as a magical protective herb. Mugwort was used to repel insects, especially moths, from gardens. Mugwort has also been used from ancient times as a remedy against fatigue and to protect travelers against evil spirits and wild animals. Roman soldiers put mugwort in their sandals to protect their feet against fatigue.[13] Mugwort is one of the nine herbs invoked in the pagan Anglo-Saxon Nine Herbs Charm, recorded in the 10th century in the Lacnunga.” Wikipedia

#mugwort #earthmagic #wip #oraclecardart #fantasyart #illustration #jade-sky #duralar #prismacolorcolerase #fae #earthspirits #oracle #belindaillustrates #australianartist #melbourneartist #july2018 #pencildrawing #happytree #forestpeople #blueangel @changelingartist (at Melbourne, Victoria, Australia)